Circuitos

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Tag Results

33 posts tagged travel


"The Qinghai–Tibet railway is a high-altitude railway that connects Xining, Qinghai Province, to Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, in People’s Republic of China.
The total length of Qingzang railway is 1956 km. This railway is the first to connect China proper with the Tibet Autonomous Region, which, due to its altitude and terrain, is the last province-level entity in mainland China to have a conventional railway. More than 960 km, or over 80% of the Golmud-Lhasa section, is at an altitude of more than 4,000 m. There are 675 bridges, totalling 159.88 km.
About 550 km of the railway is laid on permafrost. In the summer, the uppermost layer thaws, and the ground becomes muddy. Chinese engineers dealt with this problem by building elevated tracks with foundations sunk deep into the ground, building hollow concrete pipes beneath the tracks to keep the rail bed frozen, and using metal sun shades. Similar to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System portions of the track are also passively cooled with ammonia based heat exchangers.
The air in Tibet is much thinner, with a oxygen partial pressure being 35% to 40% below the partial pressure at sea level. Special passenger carriages are used, and several oxygen factories were built along the railway. At this altitude in these latitudes, water in toilets must be heated to prevent freezing. The Chinese government claimed that no construction worker died during the construction due to altitude sickness related diseases. The railway passes the Kunlun Mountains, an earthquake zone. A magnitude 8.1 earthquake struck in 2001.”
The line includes the Tanggula Pass, which, at 5,072 m above sea level, is the world’s highest rail track.

Source: Wikipedia. Next source: me :)

"The Qinghai–Tibet railway is a high-altitude railway that connects Xining, Qinghai Province, to Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, in People’s Republic of China.

The total length of Qingzang railway is 1956 km. This railway is the first to connect China proper with the Tibet Autonomous Region, which, due to its altitude and terrain, is the last province-level entity in mainland China to have a conventional railway. More than 960 km, or over 80% of the Golmud-Lhasa section, is at an altitude of more than 4,000 m. There are 675 bridges, totalling 159.88 km.

About 550 km of the railway is laid on permafrost. In the summer, the uppermost layer thaws, and the ground becomes muddy. Chinese engineers dealt with this problem by building elevated tracks with foundations sunk deep into the ground, building hollow concrete pipes beneath the tracks to keep the rail bed frozen, and using metal sun shades. Similar to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System portions of the track are also passively cooled with ammonia based heat exchangers.

The air in Tibet is much thinner, with a oxygen partial pressure being 35% to 40% below the partial pressure at sea level. Special passenger carriages are used, and several oxygen factories were built along the railway. At this altitude in these latitudes, water in toilets must be heated to prevent freezing. The Chinese government claimed that no construction worker died during the construction due to altitude sickness related diseases. The railway passes the Kunlun Mountains, an earthquake zone. A magnitude 8.1 earthquake struck in 2001.”

The line includes the Tanggula Pass, which, at 5,072 m above sea level, is the world’s highest rail track.

Source: Wikipedia. Next source: me :)

Me parto el culo.
pseudomeaningful:

Probably Be Happy (via haylieerin)
It’s so easy to disprove this theory. For instance, the following locations would most definitely make you unhappy, regardless of who you went with: A small room filled with spikes, a lava pit, a feces luncheon, my ex-mother-in-law’s house (especially on Saturday’s when she has already had three or four drinks), or outer space without a space suit.

Me parto el culo.

pseudomeaningful:

Probably Be Happy (via haylieerin)

It’s so easy to disprove this theory. For instance, the following locations would most definitely make you unhappy, regardless of who you went with: A small room filled with spikes, a lava pit, a feces luncheon, my ex-mother-in-law’s house (especially on Saturday’s when she has already had three or four drinks), or outer space without a space suit.